AKC Takes Good Position On Bad Legislation


  • July 16, 2018
  • by Barbara “BJ” Andrews

From the monthly column "On The Line". July 2018 Issue. CLICK TO SUBSCRIBE

AKC Takes Good Position On Bad Legislation

In April of this year, the Board stood firm on citizen’s rights as opposed to radical “animal rights” by proposing a Canine Legislation Position Statement on Dog Training. The AKC has not, in my opinion, always been as staunchly protective of the rights of animal owners as it should be. In years past, AKC was seen by many as pandering to animal 
rights whackos.

The newer board seems more “with it” as regards the political pressures and threats to our Constitutionally guaranteed freedoms. There was a time when dog fanciers had reason to wonder “who’s side is AKC on?” It looks like the new board has found its roots again. Oh sure, I hear you thinking ‘but AKC has had a legislative department forever’ and that is correct. As TheDogPlace.org fought the animal “rights” steamroller, I kept in close contact with the AKC Legislative department but there came a time when it all seemed hopeless.

At the risk of inserting political comment into a doggie discussion, I cross my fingers (hard as hell to type that way!) and offer the thought that the Trump administration seems to have brought back the “‘stand up to ‘em” courage that made America the place everyone wants to be.

The surge of patriotism in 2018 has to affect the American Kennel Club’s position. If you think that the non-for-profit organization isn’t political-minded and well connected, you need your brain cells rearranged.

So it is with great fanfare that I pay respect to the American Kennel Club for standing up to the subversive anti-American values of those who put the rights of animals over our own. (Sure you love your dog but you would never put the welfare of your dog over that of your children or yourself, this is BJ you’re talking to.) I say we owe AKC a round of applause for stating that “that tethering is a practical and humane method for training and restraining dogs in a variety of circumstances.” AKC goes a step further, stating “AKC opposes arbitrary government restrictions on accepted standard 
training practices.”

AKC’s Position Statement on Tethering recognizes that responsible tethering may provide an option for restraining a dog in cases where other methods of restraint are 
inappropriate or ineffective. Arbitrary anti-tethering laws undermine positive canine activities such as field trials, agility, conformation dog shows, dog training, grooming and other examinations that are part of responsible dog ownership and AKC events. (In your search engine, type thedogpress.com tethering for a quick read or go to the AKC website, 2018 Board Minutes and do a control-find 
for tethering.

One of the most constructive positions AKC has taken is the new position on Pet Imports: Protecting Pet and Public Health. AKC has concerns about the potential public health consequences of importing dogs without proof of good health. AKC supports strengthening government requirements for certifications to bring U.S. standards for imports up to those of other developed countries. Just as affirmatively, AKC supports better documentation on the number of foreign dogs imported into the U.S., details about the sources of such dogs, and whether they came by private or commercial flights. For a sad eye-opener on your competition for pet homes for your lovingly created and raised purebred puppies, Google thedogplace.org shelter imports.

I do not do social media, swore off of its predecessor, “chat lists” as invalid and often incorrect information. The ego-gratifying social media has its uses as even the networks and major newsprint publications now seek readers (and clicks) there. Facebook has serious privacy challenges in June but it serves its purpose for quick information exchange, as do Twitter and other social media vehicles.

I do not apologize for living in the horse-and-buggy days but print publications, including magazines such as this beautiful glossy production, have a duty to authenticity which is controlled by the inability to erase/remove erroneous or outright false, sensationalized hit-grabbing “journalism”.

Be it noted, however, there’s a slimy new trend in news media—known as the “retraction” or “correction”. It does not excuse deliberately falsifying information to garner readers or viewers. I plead guilty to being bound by the old-fashioned dictum which is the basis for The Word, the “little brown book” published by A/P in 1982, was once found on every reporters desk.

Underlying everything in that journalist’s bible was respect for truth and accuracy in reporting. Think about that next time you turn on the national news. Print is a bit more complicated due to the cost of printing a retraction but they still do it to avoid legal liability. TV or radio? Fuhgeddaboudit. My advice; only believe half of what you read and none of what you hear.

Unless it comes from the American Kennel Club, known legislative groups, or show dog magazines such as this beautiful print publication. 

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